Pastry chef tips – Tour double

Single fold? Double fold? When it comes to laminated doughs, you find two types of tours (literally turns, although I tend to refer to them as folds in English): the tour simple – or single fold – and the tour double – otherwise known as double fold. I’m planning on making a post describing both types, along with some notes; but today’s pastry chef tip ...

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On pâte sucrée (and my favourite lemon meringue tart)

I intended for today’s post to be short – almost-wordless short. Really, it was just meant to be a recipe that I developped for a nut-free pâte sucrée. And that what it is, in essence. With a few notes around it. In France – or at least at the pâtisseries where I worked, and in books and magazines – pâte sucrée will always call for ...

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A brioche study, recipe: the “generic” brioche (control)

Analysing the impact of the egg-to-milk ratio in brioche formulas The formula The recipe shown below will make two 500g loaves. I chose, however, to make half a batch, yielding to a single loaf, which is something I’ll carry on doing over the next experiments, as the kneading time of a half-recipe takes longer when done in a stand-mixer; more on that to come in ...

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A brioche study, part one: the approach

Analysing the impact of the egg-to-milk ratio in brioche formulas In the first part of my forever-unfinished feature How to be a pastry chef? – the checklist, I asked you some questions about brioche with the aim to develop your curiosity and drive you to research important techniques. It went along the following lines: Do you know brioche dough is an emulsion? Do you treat ...

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My ultimate kanelbullar, un peu comme des brioches

[My ultimate kanelbullar, not unlike cinnamon brioches] Tomorrow is the 4th of October. A date that doesn’t go unnoticed in Sweden. Yes, tomorrow is kanelbullens dag [cinnamon roll day]. I must have felt that this post – which I promised to share with you long before I even knew kanelbullar had their own day – was waiting in my drafts for a reason. This is ...

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Basic pâtisserie creams: la crème pâtissière

The process. Crème pâtissière is the starting point for many other creams, which we’re going to discuss over the next few articles. It’s pretty straight-forward to make. 1. Bring milk and vanilla to the boil; allow to infuse for at least half-an-hour, then pass through a fine-mesh sieve. 2. Whisk the egg yolks and sugar until combined. Then mix in the cornflour. 3. Bring the ...

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Pastry chef tips – Flatten the dough with the palm of your hand

More often than not, I always share tips and techniques in my posts. Why clingfilm to the touch, how to fold cream when making a mousse, how to get a neat crack on top of a loaf, how to blindbake tarts, and so on. But since so many of you requested, I thought I’d start a new feature* where I give you not-so-secret tips from ...

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Les élastiques

[Rubber bands] I’ve been having a bit of a rubber band moment. You see I’ve always used them in the kitchen, in one way or another, but these past few weeks, I’ve found myself reaching for the bundle we keep in – what used to be – an ice-cream tub more and more often. So I thought I’d share how I use rubber bands in ...

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A few notes on blind-baking tarts

Butter the rings I like to butter my rings before lining with dough. It will slide down the ring more easily and won’t ever ever stick to it once baked. How to roll and cut the dough These days I always roll my dough in betwen two sheets of feuille guitare, a thin acetate. If you can get your hands on it, it’s much better ...

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